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Acronyms and abbreviations ... Good use of jargon

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Acronyms and abbreviations ... Good use of jargon



Philippe Bloch, founder of Columbus Café and author of Service Included 2.0

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The PRI, the PRO, CAV VD, GNP, BFM, DEC, EDS, CC SME CGP, CTC, MSA, YES, OCP, CTC, CCGP, ICP, ADB PRO PAT, RCL, casualty, CLI PRO RAM. ..

You're not dreaming, there has twenty-two! Twenty-two acronyms or abbreviations gleaned in only thirty minute speech of a leader facing its managers, at the annual convention. Sitting in the front row waiting my turn to speak on the topic of customer passion, I can not help but smile whenever there is a new slide. Amused, I start to notice all these words which I do not understand and take a look behind me. Strangely attentive, each participant seems to follow the speech problem without bosses. The habit, no doubt. As for me, I quickly picks up and asks me every sentence what he can talk to them. Why it is expressed as in code. How long it should be necessary for new recruits to learn and master the obscure language of this business. If they all have the will, failing to have the ability. And especially if such a habit is really compatible with the willingness of this great company all now do to put the customer at the heart of the action!

This story is a perfect illustration of the difficulties facing most companies wishing to develop their culture, to become what is now called "customer-centric". Do not doubt. Who babble ... jargonnera! And jargonnera ... lose customers! Because if the employees of a "Chief jargonneur" rarely dare interrupt when they do not understand the customer to whom you impose a cryptic language typically chose to leave you without even bothering to explain why. A force to operate in isolation, any company eventually becomes inaudible and incomprehensible. Putting the customer at the heart presupposes rethinking thoroughly habits, its operation, its codes and its language, which is the daily incarnation. Does your company employs countless Abbreviations incomprehensible to the uninitiated? Or she does well hunting jargon, in order to be easily understood by everyone?
In the coming days, make the most comprehensive list possible of all these terms that are part of the DNA of your company. Write down each abbreviation, initial, abbreviation, phrase, sentence reflex, as you hear them, read them or pass them every day. Put yourself in the shoes of your customers. If they participated in internal meetings, should they interrupt you constantly to understand what you mean? If this is the case, no doubt they do not always understand your teams. Ask yourself (and instruct your employees) who are the words to banish imperative. Offer to pay one euro (or ten cents, depending on the frequency of the problem or the nature of your means) into a common fund every time they forget the new rule of the game. When evil will be defeated, celebrate together your common victory using the money thus collected to offer champagne to those who have overthrown the "jargonnite!"

Philippe Bloch,

founder and author of Columbus Café Service Included 2.0

www.servicecompris2-0.com and

www.philippebloch.com

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